Search Results : If We Want It

Letter to the Editor: “We can have it if we want it badly enough!”

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Feb 082016
 

Editorial Comment by Joanne Cvar

The 2016 election campaign is bringing media attention to health care reform, including scare tactics about the cost and viability of comprehensive universal health care.

Contrary to claims that comprehensive quality health care for everyone in the country would “break the bank,” such existing systems in Canada and Scotland spend about 40% less for universal health care coverage than we spend for our system, with better outcomes. And the Affordable Care Act currently leaves about 33 million people uninsured and many more under-insured.

Surprisingly,the cost of health care coverage for all those uninsured Americans would not raise taxes as much as the media claims. As it turns out, taxpayers already pay two-thirds of the health care dollar in the US. In addition to Medicare and Medicaid. the VA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American taxpayers, including the uninsured, pick up the tab for the benefit costs of state and federal public employees like teachers, FBI agents, firefighters and members of Congress. We also pay for the tax subsidy granted by the ACA to private health insurance, about $326 billion a year, expected to increase to $538.9 billion by 2024.

An expanded Medicare for All system in the US would result in massive savings in administrative costs. Canada and Scotland, with universal health care, pay about 16.7 cents of the health care dollar for billing and administration, while we pay about 31 cents here. We could save $400 billion annually on paperwork alone, enough to cover all of the uninsured and eliminate co-payments and deductibles for the rest of us..Without those savings, there is no way to pay for expanded coverage.

We already pay for universal health care. We just aren’t getting it. We need to counter the misinformation the media is spreading with the facts. Voters will support new taxes if they know the money will be well spent to bring health care justice to the USA at last.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputies and other law enforcement sweep county of wanted persons

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Oct 122010
 

Lincoln County law enforcement has successfully completed its 8th annual countywide sweep to arrest offenders on outstanding warrants for family violence related charges, as well as compliance checks of registered sex offenders residing in Lincoln County. The local enforcement campaign was part of the National Family Violence Apprehension Detail which involves dozens of police agencies and hundreds of law enforcement officers nationwide.

The District Attorney’s Office, Lincoln County Sheriffs Office, Lincoln City Police Department, Newport Police Department, Oregon State Police, Toledo Police Department, and Lincoln County Community Corrections conducted the Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team sweep in all areas of Lincoln County on Tuesday, October 12, 2010. The fifteen officer team made 182 registered sex offender contacts to verify compliance with registered sex offender requirements, and made 88 warrant arrest attempts. The effort of the participating officers resulted in the identification of 20 registered sex offenders who were out of compliance.

Arrest warrants will be requested for these subjects for Fail to register as a sex offender.

Sheriff Dennis Dotson stated, “The coordination and cooperation between the law enforcement agencies in Lincoln County was the principal reason for the success of this campaign. The officers involved in the sweep worked as a team and made contacts in and out of their respective jurisdictions. This effort is but one more example of our officers’, troopers’ and deputies’ commitment to making Lincoln County a safer place to live.”

(Authorized by Committee to Elect Patricia Patrick-Joling)

The Neighbors are Restless Along Oceanview Drive – Want Slower Speed Limits

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Jul 122017
 

Narrow road, no sidewalks, speed limit 35. Some of the neighbors want speed limit at 25.


Letter to the Editor

I have just returned from another harrowing walk along Oceanview from US 101 to Spring Street otherwise known as the 101 bypass. It has been two-and-a half years since the city raised the speed limit forty percent from 25 to 35 from US 101 to Edenview, a distance of almost a mile.

That first mile has hills and curves. Sight lines are short. When a driver exits 101 onto Oceanview, s/he is exiting a road where the speed limit is forty-five onto one where the speed limit is thirty-five with an immediate curve. This curve is marked with segmented yellow lines which prevail all the way to the wayside indicating it is safe to pass. It is not. From this first curve the road goes up a hill and around another curve to Meritage condos at 33rd. From the top of the hill the road goes straight down to the Agate Beach Wayside where passing is finally prohibited southbound until l7th Street. Northbound vehicles can pass starting just beyond 25th, past the busy wayside up the hill and around the curves to 101. It is possible for a vehicle to pass another northbound vehicle at the wayside resulting in two vehicles going the same way in both lanes at the place where congestion is greatest. Madness.

At the wayside cars are turning into and out of the parking lot and roadside. Adults, kids and dogs are getting in and out of cars. Sandy paws and feet are being cleaned, belongings gathered and kids corralled. People are walking to the beach along the roadside and from the Best Western, where there is now a driveway allowing vehicles onto Oceanview. Many southbound drivers slam on their brakes after barreling down the hill as they approach the congestion. With all that activity going on, the speed limit remains thirty-five. Trucks, passenger vehicles and RVs careen down that hill.

Heading south, another uphill climb. At Edenview, the beginning of a residential area, the speed limit resets to twenty-five. Would that most drivers go only twenty-five when they have just come off thirty-five, often faster.

Continuing south along Oceanview, between 19th and 17th, observe a bent and dented guard rail on the east side and a bank on the west side around an uphill curve. No place to walk. Northbound cars come wheeling around the guard rail often faster than twenty-five while southbound cars do the same around the bank. No sight lines here. Segmented lines indicate passing is allowed. Safe?

After the guard rail curve, houses on both sides of Oceanview. At 14th, an S-curve leading to Spring which has no shoulder for part of the way. Either fall into the bushes on the west side or hug a bank on the east. Segmented yellow lines to Spring indicate passing is safe. Really?

Consider:

*US 101 through Newport has a speed limit of thirty-five. The first mile of Oceanview from 101 to Edenview has a speed limit of thirty-five.

* The road through Newport is five lanes flat and straight. Oceanview is two-lanes with hills and curves.

* Through town there are several traffic lights and pedestrian crosswalks. Oceanview has neither.

* Through town 101 has sidewalks on both sides. Oceanview has none.

I described Oceanview as the 101 bypass. Most of the license plates register Oregon. Traffic strings from north and south lead to the assumption they turn onto Oceanview to avoid lights and crossings to where they can speed with near impunity. Law enforcement is not to blame. They cannot be everywhere all the time. But Officer Hayden caught two speeders within about ten minutes recently. I thanked him.

I have to jump out of the way – truly – about every eight walks. A man and his dog were put into a muddy ditch by a speeding vehicle. People walking dogs downhill to the Agate Beach Wayside want the speed limit lowered. One walker who complained said Mr. Nebel, our city manager, told her ODOT did a study and left it to the city to decide about the speed limit. The city opted to raise it. Over the last two-plus years scores of others have agreed the speed limit must be be lowered. Patrolling police officers have said speed limits are too high. When the speed limit all around was twenty-five, many did not obey it. They didn’t go twenty-five then, and they are not going thirty-five now. They don’t slow southbound when approaching the lower limit and are often already speeding northbound before the speed limit increases to thirty-five.

The speed limit from 101 to Spring should be twenty. There should be solid yellow lines along the entire length of Oceanview. Passing is currently allowed where sight lines are short, and on only a short piece of the middle section is it prohibited.

A sign on 101 at Oceanview describes it as a scenic Oregon bike route. I invite Spencer Nebel, Tim Gross and any other city official to accompany me on a three-mile walk. Those who made these decisions need to walk north and south to understand how hazardous the speed is to those not in vehicles. No villains here, just speeders and officials who don’t understand the danger Oceanview presents for walkers and bikers.

There is a meeting coming up Monday, July 17th, 6pm at Newport City Hall to discuss this matter.

Contact: Spencer Nebel, our city manager: s.nebel@newportoregon.gov or call (541) 574-0601; and Tim Gross, our public works department head: t.gross@newportoregon.gov. or call (541) 574-3369. Send comments to the News-Times. Mail this Viewpoint to each at City Hall,169 SW Coast Highway, Newport 97365 with your notes and name.

If it is necessary to present our city officials with a petition, I and others who want to walk and bike safely will be around with them.

Sincerely,

Joann Ronzio
Newport

Heavily armed gunman on the loose in Oregon. OSP trying to track him down…wants public’s help

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Jul 012017
 

Joseph Sallman
Wanted by Josephine Co. and OSP


Oregon State Police and Josephine County SO are seeking the public’s help in tracking down a person of interest in a shooting near Cave Junction.

On July 1, at approximately 2:41pm, OSP and Josephine County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a shooting in the Cave Junction area. The person of interest is Joseph SALLMAN who is armed with an AK-47 and wearing a tactical vest. SALLMAN was last seen leaving the area in a gray Dodge Durango in an unknown direction of travel.

If you see SALLMAN, call 911 and do not make contact or approach. Again SALLMAN is considered armed and dangerous.

Click here for details

Weather or Not: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow

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Jun 242017
 

Saturday, June 24th – Lincoln County

Summary: Sunny, warm, moderate sea breeze yesterday, clear overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 74F/56F/28mph/0.00”
Depoe Bay: 67F/50F/23mph/0.00”
Newport: 70F/52F/25mph/0.00”
Waldport: 62F/52F/34mph/0.00”
Yachats: 74F/50F/27mph/0.00”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: unlimited
Visibility: 10 miles/Wind: ENE 8 mph/Altimeter: 29.99”

Forecast: No record high temps were set yesterday, albeit some of our communities were just a degree or so shy of reaching a new maximum. The record of 85F for today will probably stand, too, but we’ll be close again. The latest projections show the sea breeze moderating the mercury somewhat and keeping thermometer reading down in the low-80s. Increasing clouds are expected tonight with a low of 55F. Tomorrow, onshore flow rapidly cools the Central Coast by about 20F and the high will probably not get above the low-60s. Outlook is for mixed skies, some patchy fog and drizzle, and cool temperatures all next week as highs reach 60F and lows dip to 50F.

wxon-twitterBe sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep current on the latest conditions. You’ll get updated travel info and notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are dry, temp 60F. Willamette Valley roads are dry, thermometer readings 60-65F. The Columbia River Gorge has dry pavement, temperatures 60-65F. For the Cascades, highways are dry, 50-60F, the free air freezing level is 16,000 feet.

* Outlook for weekend travelers is dry pavement at all elevations but very hot temperatures near 100F in the Valley where an Excessive Heat Advisory is in effect, 80-90F in the Cascades and along the Coast.

* An interactive map of the latest Northwest/Central Oregon travel weather is available here. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are NNE 510 knots this morning with choppy seas 6 feet at 7 seconds. A Small Craft Advisory for winds is in effect beyond 10 miles from shore from 11:00am through this evening. A south to southwest flow reversal begins over the far south waters early this evening and then spreads north Saturday night and Sunday morning. General surface high pressure will reside over local waters Monday through at least next week, with periods of small craft advisory level wind speeds. Uni-wave conditions continue through the weekend, with a dominant fresh swell and little to no background longer-period swell. All in all, seas will generally be 4-6 feet today through much of next week. However, sea conditions will remain steep and choppy due to the pre-dominant windwave component. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Sunny, breezy, surf 5-6 feet (low).
* For those coming to the Central Coast to cool off, remember that the ocean is still incredibly cold and swimming in it can rapidly cause hypothermia, loss of motor control and drowning. If you want to get your feet wet, fine, but total immersion in the frigid waters can be a killer.
* Tides
06/24 Sat 7:15 AM -2.57 L
06/24 Sat 1:57 PM 7.61 H
06/24 Sat 7:10 PM 2.19 L
06/25 Sun 1:17 AM 9.68 H

In Short: Clear, very warm, moderate sea breeze, then rapid cooling with mixed skies.

Weather or Not: A Short Heatwave

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Jun 232017
 

Friday, June 23rd – Lincoln County

Summary: Sunny, stiff sea breeze yesterday, light wind, hazy overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 67F/53F/38mph/0.00”
Depoe Bay: 63F/47F/34mph/0.00”
Newport: 63F/46F/37mph/0.00”
Waldport: 61F/48F/37mph/0.00”
Yachats: 63F/49F/35mph/0.00”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: unlimited
Visibility: 7 miles/Wind: NNE 5 mph/Altimeter: 30.13”

A Heat Advisory has been issued for the Central Coast by the National Weather Service, which is in effect from noon to 9:00pm Saturday. East winds will cause Saturday to be the hottest day at the coast with temperatures from 80-90F. The elderly, youth, and those without air conditioning will be vulnerable to the heat. Those working or exercising outdoors will be at an increased risk of dehydration and heat-related illnesses. A Heat Advisory means that a period of hot temperatures is expected. The combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will combine to create a situation in which heat illnesses are possible. Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sunshine, and check up on relatives and neighbors. Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. Wear lightweight and loose-fitting clothing when possible and drink plenty of water. When possible, reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location. Heat stroke is an emergency, call 911.

Meanwhile, area rivers are still running high and swift, while water temperatures in the 50s are common. Use extreme caution, as fatalities in and around the rivers are way too common in this type of early Summer hot weather pattern. In addition, those seeking relief from the heat at the coast will face very cold ocean conditions, also a frequent cause of death in this type of scenario.

Forecast: We could get into record high temperature territory over the next couple of days on the Central Coast. Today’s record is 67F, with a predicted high of 70-75F; tomorrow’s record is 82F, and the mercury is projected to hit 80-85F. It looks like there’ll be abundant sunshine and a moderate sea breeze this afternoon gusting 20-25 mph. Clear tonight, low about 60F. Tomorrow is expected to be the hottest of the lot with sunshine and a light northeast wind. Outlook is for increasing clouds and cooling by Sunday, highs 65-70F, then the thermometer drops to about 60F Monday and Tuesday along with patchy fog, mostly cloudy skies and some drizzle, mostly sunny Wednesday and Thursday but temps staying cool as highs only reach the upper-50s and lows slump to around 50F.

wxon-twitterBe sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep current on the latest conditions. You’ll get updated travel info and notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are dry, temps 45-55F. Willamette Valley roads are dry, thermometer readings 55-60F. The Columbia River Gorge has dry pavement, temperatures 55-60F. For the Cascades, highways are dry, 45-55F, the free air freezing level is 16,000 feet.

* Outlook for weekend travelers is dry pavement at all elevations but very hot temperatures of 90-100F in the Valley, 80-90F in the Cascades and at the Coast. * An interactive map of the latest Northwest/Central Oregon travel weather is available here. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are light nearshore but blowing NNE 15 knots gusting 20 at Stonewall Bank this morning with choppy seas 8 feet at 7 seconds. Small Craft Advisories for winds and hazardous seas are in effect through late tonight. There will be little change in the pressure pattern today, and gusty north winds and steep seas will persist. Winds will turn weakly offshore late tonight ending the advisories. The breeze beyond 20 miles from shore will still be gusty, and close to small craft advisory criteria through Saturday night. A southerly wind reversal will move northward across local waters Saturday night and Sunday. These have a tendency to end up stronger and earlier than forecast. A seasonal north wind pattern returns early next week. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Sunny, breezy, surf 6-7 feet (moderate).
* For those coming to the Central Coast to cool off, remember that the ocean is always incredibly cold and swimming in it can rapidly cause hypothermia, loss of motor control and drowning. If you want to get your feet wet, fine, but total immersion in the frigid waters can be a killer.
* Tides
06/23 Fri 6:26 AM -2.20 L
06/23 Fri 1:06 PM 7.32 H
06/23 Fri 6:16 PM 2.18 L
06/24 Sat 12:27 AM 9.73 H

In Short: Clear, moderate winds, very warm, then cool with mixed skies.

Weather or Not: Turning the Tables

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Jun 222017
 

Thursday, June 22nd – Lincoln County

Summary: Sunny, stiff sea breeze yesterday, light wind, clear overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 63F/52F/41mph/0.00”
Depoe Bay: 62F/46F/33mph/0.00”
Newport: 61F/43F/35mph/0.00”
Waldport: 59F/47F/39mph/0.00”
Yachats: 62F/49F/36mph/0.00”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: unlimited
Visibility: 10 miles/Wind: calm/Altimeter: 30.24”

A Special Weather Statement has been issued by the National Weather Service for the hottest temperatures of the year so far becoming likely across much of Northwest Oregon this weekend. The warm-up will take hold Friday with highs in the valleys reaching into the lower- to middle-90s, then peaking Saturday and Sunday in the 95-100F range. Temperatures Monday should fall back into the 80s. The coast is expected to reach into the 70s on Friday and the 80s on Saturday. Sunday could be a transition day as cooling may start to work its way northward along the coast, though the timing of this is still a bit up in the air. Temperatures in the 80s and into the 90s will be common at higher elevations as well. Prepare now for the coming hot weather. Stay hydrated, avoid exertion in the heat of the day, and find an air-conditioned building if possible.

Area rivers are still running high and swift, while water temperatures in the 50s are common. Use extreme caution, as fatalities in and around the rivers are way too common in this type of early Summer weather pattern. In addition, those seeking relief from the heat at the coast will face very cold ocean conditions, also a cause of death in this type of scenario.

Forecast: After a very wet and cool Spring, including a late-season storm just last week, the tables have quickly turned and we’re into full-tilt Summer, at least for a few days. Sunny and fairly windy again today, high around 65F. The sea breeze continues into this evening, fading after midnight, low of 50F. Tomorrow, temps warm to the low-70s with a light northeast wind. Outlook is for sunny and warm Saturday, high 80-85F, partly sunny Sunday, cooling to 65-70F, then skies become mostly cloudy Monday through Wednesday, some drizzle is possible and the thermometer drops into the low-60s.

wxon-twitterBe sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep current on the latest conditions. You’ll get updated travel info and notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are dry, temps 40-45F. Willamette Valley roads are dry, thermometer readings 50-55F. The Columbia River Gorge has dry pavement, temperatures 50-55F. For the Cascades, highways are dry, 40-50F, the free air freezing level is 15,000 feet. * An interactive map of the latest Northwest/Central Oregon travel weather is available here. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are light nearshore but blowing N 20 knots gusting 25 at Stonewall Bank this morning with choppy seas 8 feet at 7 seconds. A Small Craft Advisory for winds is in effect through Friday night. A Small Craft Advisory for hazardous seas is in effect through this evening. There will be persistent north winds on local waters through Saturday due to high pressure over the NE Pacific and thermal low pressure over NW California and S Oregon. The winds will be strongest south of Cascade Head, with frequent gusts of 25-30 knots. Winds within 10 miles of the coast will weaken during the nights, and become offshore through the early mornings. The stiff breeze will build steep and choppy seas that will reach heights of 8-10 feet south of Cascade Head at times. Weak low pressure develops across the area Saturday night and holds through Monday, resulting in a southerly wind reversal for waters mainly within 10 miles from shore. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Sunny, breezy, surf 6-7 feet (moderate).
* For those coming to the Central Coast to cool off, remember that the ocean is still incredibly cold and swimming in it can rapidly cause hypothermia, loss of motor control and drowning. If you want to get your feet wet, fine, but total immersion in the frigid waters can be a killer.
* Tides
06/22 Thu 12:11 PM 6.91 H
06/22 Thu 5:22 PM 2.14 L
06/22 Thu 11:37 PM 9.56 H
06/23 Fri 06:26 AM -2.20 L

In Short: Clear and windy, then sunny, light winds and very warm, cooling next week.

(Alsea Bay) Waldport Bridge Walkers: Heads up…walk on west side only…

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Jun 132017
 

Peregrine Falcon
Courtesy photo


A Waldport resident who routinely walks the Alsea Bay Bridge has discovered some Peregrine Falcons who have set up housekeeping nearby (aka “nest”) and they are not taking kindly to pedestrians on the bridge – the ones walking on the EAST (upriver) side of the bridge.

So she has some instructions for those who don’t want to return home a bit roughed up:

There is a Peregrine Falcon or falcons guarding the northeast end of the bridge. I think it must be a pair with a nest nearby. I saw both of them chasing off a Bald Eagle 2 weeks ago.

If you walk the east side of the bridge, past the arch, the bird will dive bomb you until you are almost to the North end of the bridge. This happened to me several times so I started my walk at the south end of the arch to avoid upsetting the bird(s).

One time it was trying to chase me off and almost got hit by a truck. Tonight, it was sitting on the handrail at the north end of the arch. But as soon as we entered the arch area it started to vocalize and then chased us off the arch.

So I’m putting out a warning for anyone walking the east side of the bridge! I would hate for anyone (human or bird) to get hurt. When we walked the WEST side it didn’t bother with us. So walk the west side of the bridge but keep a sharp out just in case!

Click here for details

Photographer running a “get well” garden….

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Jun 132017
 

Young deer at work in my front yard. This last-season fawn was struck by a car last December, limped painfully for months, lost a lot of weight, but now appears to be recovering. He can help himself to as much of my garden as he wants.
Steve Griffiths

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OSU President – “We’re staying the course on Climate Change.”

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Jun 072017
 

The warming planet. CO2 levels rising dramatically according to NASA, NOAA and “oceans” of research.

From Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University President Edward J. Ray today reaffirmed the university’s unwavering commitment to address climate change.

Ray’s memo to faculty, staff and students was prompted by the Trump administration’s announcement last week that the United States will withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change mitigation.

“I want to assure the Oregon State University community that we remain steadfast in our resolve to advance our institution’s commitments toward the global challenge of climate change,” Ray wrote. “We are resolute in our work to reduce the institution’s carbon footprint; to pursue world-class research that improves knowledge and informs strategic actions; and to empower our students and communities through education and capacity building.”

Click here for details

Ten years ago – in April, 2007 – Ray signed what was then known as the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, now known as the Carbon Commitment. It set Oregon State on an ambitious path to reduce and ultimately eliminate the university’s planet-altering institutional carbon emissions. During the last decade, OSU has reduced its annual per-student carbon emissions 38 percent.

The university has no intention to reduce or defer its commitment to climate action; instead it must continue to invest to decrease emissions further, Ray wrote.

As a Sun Grant university, OSU is an international leader in research efforts to develop renewable and low-carbon sources of energy including wave, wind, nuclear and solar energy systems. For example, in December, OSU’s Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center was awarded up to $40 million from the U.S. Department of Energy to create the world’s premier wave energy test facility in Newport.

Click here for detail

As the home of the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, OSU also participates in a network of more than 150 researchers throughout the state, including partners in state and federal agencies, who are working to address many climate issues, including ocean acidification, rising sea levels and changes in water availability and quality.

Ray concluded his memo with these words: “Let me assure you that we are unwavering in our commitment to address climate change, one of the world’s most pressing issues. We will continue to be a strong partner and collaborate with other universities, cities, states, and key federal entities. With our collective and continued resolve in these efforts, I am confident that Oregon State will continue to be a leader in climate change research and sustainability to provide a healthy planet for all of us.”

Click here for details